Happy Hallowe’en & More

Happy Hallowe’en & More

High School Middle School The Study Academy Report

Can you feel it? The chill in the air… The falling leaves… The pumpkin spice… It can only mean one thing: Fall is here! And with Fall comes Hallowe’en, arguably the best non-holiday holiday of the year. This year, it lands squarely on a Monday, so I expect we’ll be seeing all sorts of appropriate (e.g., following dress code, no real or fake weapons) costumes at school. A few of us grown-up types may even don some festive wear, and we have a bunch of fun activities planned for the day, including games, movies, and a sprinkling of allergen-free goodies. This Monday, you can be anything you want to be, so come be awesome with us!

Beyond the immediate spookiness of Monday, we have a bunch of great stuff coming up that you’ll definitely want to read about. First up is our Annual Parent Social, happening tonight, from 7 – 10pm. Have you ever wished for an easier way to meet your fellow parents? Craved some time away from home? Wondered what it would be like to have fun on a Thursday night? Well now you can do all of these things and more! All current and prospective parents are invited to The Study Academy to mix, mingle, and meet other parents. We’ll provide the food and libations; just bring yourself! We’ll also be handing out Open House flyers to parents who are interested in enrolling their child(ren) at The Study, which brings me to my next point…

Tuesday, November 8th, marks our annual Open House. For those attending, come prepared to be inspired! This once-in-a-year opportunity will allow you to meet the faculty and tour our facility, watch our neurofeedback research program in action, and check out our clubs, programs, and more! With our 5:1 student-to-teacher ratio, personalized learning, highly qualified and engaging faculty, and innovative educational research, we equip our students with the academic proficiencies, learning skills, and passion to become lifelong independent learners.

Speaking of equipping our students with invaluable skills, we have had a bunch of excellent excursions since our last blog. In late September and mid-October, our senior high school students attended the Ontario College and University Information Fairs. During these trips, they got the opportunity to browse Ontario’s post-secondary offerings, with both university and college programs to accommodate the wide range of their interests. They picked up promotional materials and other branded goodies, engaged in interactive demonstrations, spoke with school reps, and came back with a better sense of their plans after high school. Later in October, all of our high schoolers visited the Aga Khan Museum, offering them exposure to the artistic, intellectual, and scientific heritage of Muslim civilizations across the centuries from the Iberian Peninsula to China. One of the goals of this trip, as well as the Museum’s mission, was to foster a greater understanding and appreciation of the contribution that Muslim civilizations have made to world heritage. Through education, research, and collaboration, the Museum fosters dialogue and promotes tolerance and mutual understanding among people.

While our high school students were off on their adventures, our middle schoolers also had a couple of exciting field trips at Bathurst Bowlerama and the Evergreen Brick Works. The former was a fun welcome/welcome back trip for all of our new and returning students, as well as a chance to get out of the classroom and get active. The Evergreen Brick Works, on the other hand, was a trip for the body and mind with the students’ participation in their Cycling in the City: Active Transportation program. There, they got to “explore the Brick Works through one of the world’s most energy-efficient machines – the bicycle. Students … [used] simple machines to craft and test obstacle courses and explore comparative force, while developing fundamental physical literacy skills. [One of the goals was to] get students excited about riding as transportation and recreation by designing bike routes to school, while discussing many aspects of cycling in the city and incorporating the social and environmental impact of active transportation.”

Looking forward, the middle schoolers will have a field trip to the Art Gallery of Ontario on November 11th. We’ll have many more details – and permission forms – to come soon! The week before that, on November 2nd, Grade 9 students will get a chance to shadow their parents at work through the Take Our Kids to Work Program. “The program supports career development by helping students connect school, the world of work, and their own futures.” On November 2nd, take your child to work, but make sure to tell us first!

That’s all for now! Stay tuned for more exciting news and events.

Welcome Back, CEC, & IMBES

Welcome Back, CEC, & IMBES

Educational Research High School Middle School The Study Academy Report

Greetings! Welcome back! I hope your summer was everything you’d ever hoped it would be and more.

First off, please let me introduce myself: My name is Ariana. I enjoy long walks on the beach, sunsets, and filing OSRs. In other words, I am the new School Administrator, and I am pleased to handle all of your administrative needs. I have also assumed the role of Blog Master, so here we go:

Once again, welcome back! We’re glad to see so many new and returning faces, and we’re excited about everything that this year has in store. Already, we’ve had our high school trip to the Canadian Ecology Centre, Parent Welcome Meeting, taken student card photos, had our first assembly and fire drill of the year (which everyone aced), and will soon begin our extracurricular clubs and activities. We’re powering through and loving every second of it. On to thing two!

Various balls on the groundDuring the first week back, we had our start-of-year high school trip to the Canadian Ecology Centre (CEC). For those of you who don’t know, the CEC is a non-profit environmental science education and research facility. They share the landscape with Samuel de Champlain Park, as well as the goal of “conserving and protecting our natural environment.” Their aim is to “[facilitate] informed choices [for all of their visitors] – presenting a better understanding of the conservation and development issues related to the environment and [associated] sectors. The CEC is also home to the Canadian Institute of Forestry”, and from September 6th to 9th, they housed our high school students. During that week, Grades 9 – 12 got to engage in some awesome activities, including: Team building and other group exercises, swimming, canoeing, drumming, astronomy, night vision and campfire construction, wilderness survival, stream and aquatic study, Creatures of the Night and Living Discovery Lab, orienteering and introduction to GPS, and intro to GIS. It was a packed week, but the group had a great time and learned some important information about our environment, and themselves, in the process. Trips like this are a great way to supplement classroom learning, facilitate teamwork, and present an opportunity for students to participate in outdoor education, but they also provide a practical understanding of nature and the environment, situating it in a context that then becomes more relatable and, thus, more actionable. We are dedicated, through these experiences, to the growth of our students both in the classroom and beyond; at present and into the indefinite future.

Lastly, we are very pleased to announce that our very own Jason Krell, Patrick Dolecki, and Anderson Todd have been accepted to present their research at the International Mind, Brain, & Education Society’s (IMBES) 2016 conference here in Toronto! IMBES’ mission is to “facilitate cross-cultural collaboration in biology, education, and the cognitive and developmental sciences.” They aim to “improve the state of knowledge in, and dialogue between, education, biology, and the developmental and cognitive sciences; create and develop resources for scientists, practitioners, public policy makers, and the public; and create and identify useful information, research directions, and promising educational practices. [They] invite researchers and practitioners at all levels of education to explore the questions and proposed solutions that emerge at the intersection of mind, brain, and education.” This year’s conference featured keynotes from Dr. Clancy Blair, on The Development of Self-Regulation in Early Childhood; Dr. Tania Lombrozo, on The Good, The Bad, and the Beautiful (evidence for broad/simple explanation preference in children and adults); Dr. Marla Sokolowski, on Gene-Environment Interplay in Individual Differences in Behaviour; Dr. Janet Werker, on Perceptual Foundations of Language Acquisition; and Dr. Pasi Sahlberg, on About the Facts and the Myths about Education in Finland: Mind, brain, and smart education policies.

Neurofeedback schematic diagramKrell, Dolecki, & Todd (2016)’s poster, Executive Functions Through Attention, covered their research on the effects of neurofeedback training (NT) on attention and executive functioning (e.g., self-regulation, cognitive flexibility, reasoning, problem-solving, planning) in Gr. 5 – 8 students. NT teaches individuals to self-regulate by providing direct feedback on temporal and spatial patterns in brain activity. Using EEG measurement, it rewards individuals for attending effectively, encouraging them to attend further. In their presentation, they noted the changing landscape of education, with increasingly personalized learning, expanded accessibility, and new desired learning outcomes centred on adaptive competencies. Despite this, as well as the promising evidence of its effectiveness for individuals with and without ADHD, educational research on NT is presently scarce. This motivated them to examine the relationship between the use of this specific technology and student attention/executive functioning. After acquiring the appropriate assent and consent, data was gathered from semi-weekly, 30-minute training sessions, and performance was assessed by parents and teachers. Results support that both teachers and parents observed decreases in the relative occurrence of inattentive behaviours over the course of the NT sessions. This supports the hypothesis that NT can be effectively used in a classroom setting to supplement student learning and existing growth, and improve attention, planning, and organizational skills. In short, we’ve not seen the end of NT at The Study Academy, and we’re excited to see what else we can do with it moving forward.

That’s all for now! Stay tuned for more exciting news and events.

Exploring Principles of Learning and Teaching

Exploring Principles of Learning and Teaching

Educational Research High School Middle School The Study Academy Report

At The Study Academy, we’re often acquainting ourselves with recent research on effective teaching strategies and structures of learning. In a recent search, we encountered an article on the website of the American Psychological Association entitled, “Top Twenty Principles From Psychology for PreK-12 Teaching and Learning” (which you can access directly here). After reading through the enclosed principles, I recognized that many of them were already underlying the framework of instruction that I’ve both witnessed and undertaken at The Study Academy. Since that’s the case, and since readers can have a glance at the principles themselves, what I’ve written below is not a summary of all 20 of the key principles outlined in the article, but instead, my own thoughts and relationship to 4 of those principles, both as an instructor and a learner.

What I quickly realized while writing was that I was gravitating toward principles that had a lot to do with personal responsibility. I think this has to do with my own personal optimism about the competency of students and the value of autonomy, but it perhaps equally has to do with the student-centred nature of instruction of The Study Academy.

So, in glorious non-chronological order, here are my thoughts:

As we are already well into the academic year, students are facing numerous types of deadlines. Deadlines are, of course, inevitable and necessary fixtures of academic proceedings. If heeded with the proper care, deadlines can incentivize students to develop crucial organizational skills that possess lifelong applicability. And yet, we all know that any kind of project quickly becomes dreary when the looming spectre of a deadline forms the sole motivation for academic progress. We know intuitively that curiosity and innovation resides in domains beyond the fear of a deadline. The ninth principle illuminates why this is the case: “students tend to enjoy learning and to do better when they are more intrinsically rather than extrinsically motivated to achieve.” The article refers to deadlines and reward systems (such as the approval of teachers and parents) as examples of extrinsic motivators. The approval of others is certainly not a bad thing in itself, but it does appear that over-reliance on it may not be the most promising enterprise. While intrinsic motivation can come in various forms, researchers say that a really important core belief to achieve it is through the understanding that learning is inherently valuable — this, the authors assert, is one major way students come to progress for their own sake. And since extrinsic conditions are unstable and impermanent, the quest for intrinsic motivation makes for a more resilient position.

So, how do we accomplish this as teachers? In my own experience in this role, I encourage autonomy through classroom discussion and debate. I always strive for a mix of designing discussion topics and allowing students to do so. In my undergraduate degree, I had an English professor who said, “Texts won’t give you answers to questions you don’t ask.” That remark made an instant impression on me. I figured since it wouldn’t be possible for me to predict the questions an instructor expected me to ask, I would necessarily be engaging in a unique and radically individual exercise by posing questions of my own devising. And certainly, as I kept asking the text questions, the more personally relevant my questions became. They became so relevant, in fact, that it felt like I was working beyond the parameters of a single assignment. Thus, when I instruct English courses now, I always put emphasis on open dialogue and reflection, and remind students of the infinity of questions they can ask. My rationale is that if they are able to strike upon an interplay of personal reference points and the work at hand, this constructs a sturdy bridge to a wealth of intrinsic motivation. Furthermore, the meaning of the work has ripple effects far outside the bounds of the particular assignment, and therefore we are not dealing only with extrinsic motivations anymore.

Of course, knowledge acquisition is not limited to gaining entirely new information; it is also about challenging and, if necessary, reshaping previous assumptions and hypotheses. Principle 2 of the article speaks to this by distinguishing between conceptual growth (gaining new information) and conceptual change (reforming old assumptions). The first stage for teachers when exploring new subject matter is to gauge which strategy needs to be employed. Lessons and evaluations provide instructors the chance to gauge the baseline level of understanding. According to the article, if the baseline understanding is in line with curricular expectations, then instructors can plan their exercises in a way that fosters conceptual growth. However, when an instructor encounters a student working under an apparent misconception, instead of simply trying to change that “wrong thinking” on the spot, the instructor might rather set the stage for that student to self-correct. A student is only able to do that, though, if he or she has the space to try and advance their idea to a deeper stage of critical investigation. A tactic I use when I lead class discussions is in a sense echoing responses back to students. If I am able to maintain a non-judgemental yet skeptical tone, it opens up room for what in some cases may be very productive doubt. Moreover, having their ideas voiced by another person can be a way to help students gain critical distance from which vantage point they can either defend, revise, or outrightly change their assertions.

Keeping with the theme of personal responsibility, Principle 7 emphasizes the importance of self-regulation, which includes a broad range of capacities needed for academic success, including attention and self-control. The article stresses that teachers can help students improve these crucial abilities. We agree, and that’s evident through our curricular offerings and daily schedules. Students practice self-regulation everyday through meditation. We organize it so that students engage in the practice in a group, but with total autonomy and control over their experience. Since the only rules are that students sit in a comfortable position in silence, we avoid imposing rigid methodology onto how they self-regulate. Students who use the brain technology games we offer have a similar level of personal freedom while honing their focus. Additionally, the Learning Strategies course can also be a great way for students to work on organizational skills needed to stay on top of course work.

Another way to think about the Learning Strategies course is as an opportunity to transfer skills. Students may learn strategies geared toward building links between separate ideas. That way, in science, they are likely to forge the connection between algae growth and aquatic ecosystems, for example. Another way to think about this academic process is through Principle 4’s discussion of contexts. The authors clarify, first of all, that all learning does in fact occur in particular contexts, and that “generalizing learning to new contexts is not spontaneous but needs to be facilitated”.

One basic question we might ask upon reading this principle is the following: What are some examples of different contexts? Another question may come about when we pay further attention to the language of the principle. How can we as educators “facilitate” both context traversal and the application of ideas from one context to another?

Let’s take one context shift that the article mentions for example: students can take textbook knowledge and see how the ideas actually operate with and animate physical environments. I now realize that this is why I was so intuitively eager to write on the annual Brain Camp (you can access the entry here) event last year. This was an end-of-year event during which students stepped into a diverse set of contexts. They took part in outdoor activities, creative projects, attended various cultural sites, and more. On a broad level, the organization of these multifarious events was the facilitation for students to engage with different contexts. For instance, science experiments gave students the chance to enter a socially interactive and highly sensory context, in contrast to the text-based study of scientific formulas and principles. Or, when students worked on film-making, they entered a context of application for which all their instruction on narrative elements came in handy. One of the substantial boons of these new levels of engagements are that they necessitate mental activity beyond the surface level. Instead of rote memorization, students considering an impressionist painting at the Art Gallery of Ontario must draw from deeper wells of curiosity and critical thinking.

And certainly, students are encouraged to jump between contexts in creative and new ways. After all, Principle 4 is all about frame-breaking and “thinking outside the box”. So, for instance, during Brain Camp when they were asked to cook (or for the assertive students who cook at home), the students might stop and think about the ways in which kitchen utensils are made with materials that optimize heat conductivity for the purpose of cooking, while stifling the distribution of heat along the handles for the purposes of safety. Such an act of application takes conductivity from the subject-specific domain of science and applies it to real life tasks and tools.

Ultimately, the article from the APA strikes me as having the potential to be incredibly useful for students, their parents, and instructors. It includes practical tips for achieving academic objectives and explains why those objectives are worthwhile. While I hope my own thoughts in this piece have made for an interesting read, I strongly encourage readers to peruse the source material, as I’ve referred to a mere fraction of what’s included in it. Happy reading!

It’s Brain Camp!

It’s Brain Camp!

High School Middle School The Study Academy Report

Looking forward to mid-June? If you’re a student of The Study Academy, you should probably start. That’s because we’ve got a truly exciting set of activities planned from June 15-26. It’s our way of both thanking and rewarding students for their progress and hard work this year. And since education is what the staff and faculty here know and love, what better activities to plan than ones of the educational ilk? What we have in store is better than camp – it’s Brain Camp!

For teachers at The Study Academy, one of the objectives that always underlie our lessons plans is to set the stage for student-centred, experiential learning. We use a variety of methods to achieve that end in our classrooms. At its core, the vision of Brain Camp is about expanding those same objectives into a very new set of experiences. So while the activities we’ve planned will optimize long-term skills like critical thinking and problem-solving, we’ve also ensured that they’re interesting and enable the students to engage in practical application. Students will enjoy and be challenged by a QR scan code scavenger hunt, physical education, applied mathematics, cooking, video game creation, current events investigation and reporting, drama and outdoor games, movie-making, science experiments, and art projects.

In addition to bringing about new experiences, we also think of Brain Camp as a great way to get students into new spaces. That’s exactly what we’ll be doing with field trips to the AGO, Skyzone, Bounce World, Brick Works and Queen’s Park. We’ll be starting those days at The Study Academy, but we’ll be venturing out from there (being located so close to public transportation has definite perks!).

Teachers Eric and Jonathan are both eagerly preparing for their roles as coordinators for Brain Camp. In addition to serving as guardians and ensuring everyone’s on schedule throughout each day’s events, they’ll also be taking on the tricky task of consultation for students deciding how and what to investigate during the activities. This means judging when it’s appropriate to lend their voices, and when it’s appropriate to step back. We think striking that balance is the best way to assure a support system so students feel safe enough to partake in independent work.

Brain Camp will take place from 9am-3pm every school day from June 15-26, and will include students from 9-14 years old. We’re proud that in only two weeks from today, we’ll be facilitating this combination of academic enrichment, field trips, and activities, and assisting students in worthwhile accomplishments. See you there!

Exploring the Deep Blue Sea: Ripley’s Aquarium!

Exploring the Deep Blue Sea: Ripley’s Aquarium!

Middle School

Hello Readers,

photo 6

Our students building their very own plankton!

I hope you all have an exciting long weekend planned. Quite a few of our students mentioned some rather fun plans they were arranging, however, that is only after speaking so enthusiastically about their adventure at Ripley’s Aquarium.  I’m sure you recall how earlier this month a group of High School students traveled there for our Workshop week. If not, please check out the post at your leisure.

Just like our High School students, Middle School students and faculty truly enjoyed this educational and entertaining field trip. So, what were some of the activities that our animated students spoke so highly of?  The Great Plankton Challenge was certainly a highlight for many and featured academic ties to the Science curriculum. You might be thinking that something as small as plankton couldn’t possibly be so interesting. Well, dear reader, I am glad to tell you that you are wrong. Students were delighted and inspired; they learned how essential the role of the small organism truly is to our larger ocean biodiversity! They were even given a chance to design their own perfect plankton!

 

photo 7

Life within coral!

Middle School students were also able to explore the multiple galleries available at this large Toronto aquarium.  In the Canadian waters exhibit, the students saw more local creatures such as as lobster and largemouth bass. In the Rainbow Reef, students learned about more tropical fish originating from the Indo-Pacific region.  There was even an exhibit called “Planet Jellies”! I bet you can guess what creatures were there! Tons of beautiful jelly fish and information on their fascinating life cycle! The fun, however, did not stop at that — students were also able to interact with the aquatic life! They were able to touch some aquatic life at the Horseshoe Crab Touch Pool, and pet stingrays in the touch tanks, as well as watch divers feed stingrays from their very own hands.

Overall, it was a very exciting and informative day for our Middle School students. Now they are all off to enjoy a relaxing long weekend, which I hope you do as well, dear Reader.

Till next week!

The Study Academy Lab Campaign : Turning Science into Smarts

The Study Academy Lab Campaign : Turning Science into Smarts

Educational Research High School Middle School

Hello Readers,

I also wanted to mention to you all the exciting news about The Study Academy Lab’s campaign to build the first Canadian K-12 Educational Research Lab! In an interview with Principle Jason Krell, he states that “there has been some considerable work going on to initiate funding for not just research activities, but for a fully operational lab at The Study Academy.”

Neurfeedback training for ADHDWell, today they have launched their campaign with an Indiegogo crowd-funding platform and an additional video to communicate their vision (http://vimeo.com/69015735) .The footage was taken by Vlad Lunin (http://vladlunin.com/)  at the school and is a mixture of the old and new; old in the images of the building and in the personal interaction between student and teacher, and new in the implementation of novel and groundbreaking technologies (Neurofeedback headsets in school).

The video conveys The Study’ Academy’s Lab’s motto of turning “Science into Smarts”. The lab will work on the premise that change in Education must be recognized from the grass-root level, with the emergence of empirical evidence. In fact, it is the Study Academy’s vision to develop such empirical evidence with tools and methods for training wisdom through developing cognition, training attention, and goal setting.

The three main goals of the lab are

  1. To bridge the gap between research and pedagogy which the public and private school systems have ignored. We will be researching methods and tools that will augment traditional learning processes and replace worn out teaching models.
  2. To give students the ability to better use their brains to allow for more effective learning. In other words, we want to train students to intelligently use their intelligence.
  3. To design tools and better implement technology that will train students’ attention, problem solving abilities, thinking and rationality. In essence, we want students to gain not only knowledge but wisdom as well.

The research lab will offer an unprecedented opportunity to work with existing basic research findings from the fields of Cognitive Science, Psychology and Neuroscience and to generate and test hypotheses in the classroom.

Also,w e have a great team to head this growing research lab, including Patrick K Dolecki as the Research Coordinator, Jason Krell, John Vervaeke  (http://www.newcollege.utoronto.ca/academics/new-college-academic-programs/buddhism-psychology-and-mental-health/centre-for-buddhism-and-psychology/the-buddhism-psychology-mental-health-program/faculty/dr-john-vervaeke/), a University of Toronto Professor and our Research Advisor and Anderson Todd as our Creative Advisor. They have all been working hard to create this facility from the ground up!

John Vervake giving a talk about Mindfulness Meditation at a Ted Talk at U of T

That is why we need your help, Readers. Through the website Indiegogo, The Study Academy hopes to raise money that will assist their researching and designing projects.The funding will contribute to such things as providing wages for the research team, pay for a 3D printer, new hardware (including neurofeedback, headsets, eye tracking devices and motion detection cameras), cloud back up services to secure data, software and a small business server to handle such lab software.

The Study Academy Lab will be of great interest to a rather wide audience including families of school aged children who have an interest in new educational model that will empower their children and prepare them for the careers and independence that await them; to educators and school administrators who support the need for the educational reform and progressive and evidence based teaching methods; and to students who have an interest in participating in learning activities directed towards their specific profile.

Thus, it is the hope of The Study Academy to join the conversation of what education “should be” and how it will reform in the coming years. Here at The Study Academy  “we not only want to teach students, we want to make them smarter.” Please help support our cause so we can create a better tomorrow for students. They deserve it.

Fun Times at The Study Academy’s Brain Camp

Fun Times at The Study Academy’s Brain Camp

Middle School The Study Academy Report

Hello Readers,

It has certainly been busy these past few days at The Study Academy and I’m here to tell you that there are only more exciting things to come this week. Never a dull moment, eh?  As I had mentioned in an earlier post, children had the option to spend two additional weeks after the end of the school year to engage in creative and educational activities at our Brain Camp. Small classes benefit student learning.

I was able to contact the head teacher of Brain Camp, Meghan Patrick, to discuss what has been going on at camp so far. I was told that In the morning the students engaged in collaborative story writing activities and practiced parts of speech with mad lib games on the smart board. This was intended to ensure that the students got their “creative juices”, so to speak, flowing for the rest of the day; however one must also recognize this was an excellent way to assist the children in expanding their diction and structure.

butterfliesThe students also have started all afternoons with collaborative drama games. This week, students gathered round in a circle in the gymnasium and acted out assigned characters or scenes on their own or with a partner chosen by their teacher. The intention behind this activity was so that students could continue to work on their communication skills, especially in non verbal areas of communication.

Students also practiced a bit of video game creation that focused on creating shorelines based on earlier lessons on Medieval times and ancient Egypt. This had been possibly the most exciting part of the day for the kids, as they put their knowledge towards a fun and tangible goal. As Brain Camp will be ending off this week, the teachers have arranged a wonderful  trip for the students to the Ontario Science centre to check out the IMAX movie, “Flight of the Butterflies”(http://www.si.edu/Imax/movie/71). As you can tell the students coming to The Study for this final week of Brain Camp are really going to be having fun right to the end!

A Year in Review at The Study Academy

A Year in Review at The Study Academy

Educational Research High School Middle School

Hello Readers,

with classes ending, its been making me think of all that’s happened through the year. I’ve tried to share them all with you each and every week. We have also discussed many of the recent and pressing issues in Education and research. I must say, it  has definitely been quite exciting each and every week.

When I first was approached to write for The Study Academy’s blog, I was shocked. The first concern that came to my mind was how could I make these posts relevant to you, the Reader. I knew it had to be about The Study Academy, but I felt there just had to be something more. It came to me one morning- Theoretical Thursdays!  In addition to Tuesday’s The Study Academy Reports, Theoretical Thursdays has come to comprise the basis for this blog.Neurfeedback training for ADHD

The posts these past few months have been diverse, but I hope they have been informative. On every Tuesday’s The Study Academy Report I tried to detail to you all the exciting happenings going on at school, both in the Highschool and Middle School sections. In some of my posts, I’ve written about the Neurofeedback training at The Study Academy lab, or the Study Academy’s small class sizes.  I also detailed to you about the exciting volunteering abroad opportunity that some of the students took in Nicaragua and the array of activities during Inspire Week. In the last remaining weeks, as things slowed down I spoke about the music classes available, the anti bullying policies at the school, the structured educational system, the theatrical performances by students, and the exciting new work happening at The Study Academy lab.

Teaching methods based on graduate research in action!Likewise , every Theoretical Thursday you, the Reader, were provided with the exciting research happening around the world and its relevance to Education and your child. You learned about the lasting effects of smaller class sizes, the self control technique of Mindfulness, the importance of divergent thinking in children, and the exciting new method of detecting autism.  In addition, I discussed the importance of music and goal setting for children, while using the most up to date and relevant research. Those who read my previous posts also learned the dangers of stereotype threat for young girls who like Math and the ways to prevent their impact, as well as how to use the structure of memory to one’s advantage so children will not forget their lessons over the break.

To say the least, we have had some very good time this year at The Study Academy, however summer is finally here, so we are going to have to say goodbye to our regular Tuesday posts, The Study Academy Report. The final The Study Academy Report will be next week . It will be detailing the last days of Brain Camp. However, it will be replaced with a new opinion section. All my readers will now get an opportunity to interact and really give your opinions about Education and Research. So, definitely don’t stop dropping by on Tuesday; instead come as you are and bring your opinions with you!

Almost Summer Time!

Almost Summer Time!

High School Middle School

Hello Readers,

Summer break is nearly here, but I’m sure you already knew that since you (or your children/students) have been counting down the days on the calendar! As the days get warmer and the end of the year draws near, it will be a challenge to keep children interested in learning. However, the last few weeks of school are an intense time. As I walked around The Study Academy, I saw both the Middle School and Highschool children finishing up on their projects and papers that are to be handed in. Some of them were furiously studying for those final tests and exams too!

Middle school at Centre Island I’m here to tell you that all their effots will be rewarded. Both the Highschool and Middle school classes will be celebrating the end of classes on the final day of class. Last week the Middle school was rewarded for all their hard work with a visit to Centre Island. The students got the opportunity to laugh and have fun while sharing their exciting plans for the Summer. The Highschool students will be following suit by visiting Wonderland this week on Thursday after the completion of the final exams.

Some of the students will in fact be taking additional school to further their studies. To those few, I figuratively tip my hat off to your dedication and thirst for knowledge. Others are going on adventures around the globe to learn about new cultures, histories and people. Finally, some are staying home with their families or going to local camps where they will deepen their bonds of friendship.

Whatever these students ultimately decide to do, I wish to all the students at The Study Academy a summer full of joy, friendship and at-least a little bit of learning in between.